Department of Biochemistry University of Oxford Department of Biochemistry
University of Oxford
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Oxford OX1 3QU

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Anaphase bridges in fission yeast cells
Whitby lab
Lactose permease represented using bending cylinders in Bendix software
Caroline Dahl, Sansom lab
Epithelial cells in C. elegans showing a seam cell that failed to undergo cytokinesis
Serena Ding, Woollard lab
Collage of Drosophila third instar larva optic lobe
Lu Yang, Davis lab
First year Biochemistry students at a practical class
Image showing the global movement of lipids in a model planar membrane
Matthieu Chavent, Sansom lab
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Recent news from the Garman Group

Front cover of May issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation. Reproduced with permission from Crystallography Journals Online (http://journals.iucr.org)

Front cover of May issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation. Reproduced with permission from Crystallography Journals Online (http://journals.iucr.org) (Click to enlarge)

Oliver Zeldin, an EPSRC-funded graduate student in Professor Elspeth Garman's group, has won a prize for the best Young Crystallographer’s talk at the recent British Crystallographic Association (BCA) Spring Meeting in Keele. Oli is on the Life Sciences Interface Programme of the Doctoral Training Centre in Oxford. His talk was entitled 'High-throughput metallo-protein analysis by microPIXE’. The prizes, awarded by the Industrial Group of the BCA, included the opportunity to present the talk in the main meeting. 

The front cover of the May issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation (JSR) features the results of Eugenio de la Mora, a Mexican graduate student who visited the Garman group from January to July 2009. His paper is on using radical scavengers to reduce the rate of X-ray induced radiation damage to macromolecular crystals both during cryotemperature (100 K) data collection.

In hen egg white lysozyme crystals held at 100 K, sodium nitrate, an electron scavenger, was found to double the dose (Gy=J/kg) tolerance as judged from the rate of total diffraction intensity loss, and increase it by over 5 times when considering structural damage to the disulfide bonds. The sequential electron density maps show the radiation chemistry mechanism at work.

Eugenio’s paper has also been selected for highlighting in the next issue of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) Newsletter and will appear on the IUCr web site (http://journals.iucr.org/services/newsletter/newsletter-articles.html).

The May issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation contains 10 papers, including Eugenio’s, presented at the Sixth International Workshop on Radiation Damage to Crystalline Biological Samples. The workshop was organised by a committee chaired by Professor Garman, who also acted as a guest editor of the issue along with Martin Weik (Institut de Biologie Structurale, Grenoble), with whom she co-authored the introductory paper.

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