Department of Biochemistry University of Oxford Department of Biochemistry
University of Oxford
South Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3QU

Tel: +44 (0)1865 613200
Fax: +44 (0)1865 613201
First year Biochemistry students at a practical class
Image showing the global movement of lipids in a model planar membrane
Matthieu Chavent, Sansom lab
Anaphase bridges in fission yeast cells
Whitby lab
Lactose permease represented using bending cylinders in Bendix software
Caroline Dahl, Sansom lab
Epithelial cells in C. elegans showing a seam cell that failed to undergo cytokinesis
Serena Ding, Woollard lab
Collage of Drosophila third instar larva optic lobe
Lu Yang, Davis lab
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Finding Out More About Biochemistry

Finding out more about biochemistry / suggested reading

Finding out about biochemistry:
The following are popular science books and give a good place to start for anyone who wants to find out something about biochemistry, or just wants some fun background reading.

“The selfish gene”, “The ancestors' tale” and other books by Richard Dawkins.
“Y, the descent of man” by Steve Jones.
“The eighth day of creation: the makers of the revolution in biology” by Horace Judson.
“Power, sex and suicide - mitochondria and the meaning of life” and other books by Nick Lane.
“Advice to a young scientist” by Peter Medawar.
“Genome - autobiography of a species”, “Nature via Nurture” and other books by Matt Ridley.
“The seven daughters of Eve” by Bryan Sykes.

There is a series of booklets on different aspects of biochemistry “Biochemistry Across the School Curriculum (BACS)” available for download free from the Biochemical Society  (link on right).

There are also web resources available at the Association for Science Education (ASE) web site (link on right).

From school to university biochemistry - transitional textbooks:
These provide a gentle introduction to studying biochemistry at a university level.

“Life, chemistry and molecular biology”, W. Pickering, C. Smith and E.J. Wood, pub. Portland Press.
“Why chemical reactions happen”, J. Keeler and P. Wothers, pub. OUP.
“Bringing chemistry to life: from matter to man”, R.J.P. Williams and J.J.R.F. da Silva, pub. Oxford University Press.
“Catch Up Maths & Stats for the life and medical sciences”, M. Harris, G. Taylor and J. Taylor, pub. Scion.
“Catch Up Chemistry for the life and medical sciences”, M. Fry and E. Page, pub. Scion.

Useful books to prepare for the start of the Oxford biochemistry course:
These are very highly recommended for students who are daunted by the maths and organic chemistry components of the course to look at in advance, but would be useful for everyone.

“Foundation maths” (2006) A. Croft and R. Davison, pub. Pearson.
“Foundations of organic chemistry” (1993) M. Hornby and J. Peach, pub. Oxford University Press.

First year text books for the Oxford biochemistry course:
There are no set course texts (and you will probably want to try books out from libraries before deciding what, if anything, to buy) but the following are some of the more popular recommended texts.

“Biochemistry” (2015) J.M. Berg, J.L. Tymoczko and L. Stryer, pub. W.H. Freeman.
“Biochemistry” (2011) D. Voet and J.G. Voet, pub. Wiley.
“Molecular Cell Biology” (2012) H. Lodish, et al,  pub. W.H. Freeman.
“Molecular Biology of the Cell” (2014) B. Alberts et al., pub. Garland.
“Practical Skills in Biomolecular Sciences” (2012) R. Reed, D. Holmes, J. Weyers and A. Jones, pub. Prentice Hall.
“Principles and problems in physical chemistry for biochemists” (2001) N.C. Price, R.A. Dwek, R.G. Ratcliffe and M.R. Wormald, pub. Oxford University Press.

... and on the lighter side:

The Biochemist's Songbook (MP3 files).
Zheng Lab - Bad Project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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