Department of Biochemistry University of Oxford Department of Biochemistry
University of Oxford
South Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3QU

Tel: +44 (0)1865 613200
Fax: +44 (0)1865 613201
Image showing the global movement of lipids in a model planar membrane
Matthieu Chavent, Sansom lab
Anaphase bridges in fission yeast cells
Whitby lab
Lactose permease represented using bending cylinders in Bendix software
Caroline Dahl, Sansom lab
Epithelial cells in C. elegans showing a seam cell that failed to undergo cytokinesis
Serena Ding, Woollard lab
Collage of Drosophila third instar larva optic lobe
Lu Yang, Davis lab
First year Biochemistry students at a practical class
Bootstrap Slider

Seminars

iCal Feed: http link (Download) or webcal link (Subscribe)

TBA TBA Thursday 30th March 11:00 - 12:00 Shu-Sin Chng National University of Singapore Biochemistry Department Seminar Bacterial lipid trafficking and outer membrane homeostatis Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
TBA TBA Thursday 30th March 14:00 - 15:00 Fiona Naughton University of Oxford SBCB Seminar Series On the lesser known uses of umbrellas: investigating interactions of PH domains with membranes through umbrella sampling Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
anna.duncan@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 3rd April 12:00 - 13:00 Gaby Maimon The Rockefeller University CNCB Seminar Series A Circuit Architecture for Angular Integration Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, Old Indian Institute Building, Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD
Mammalian brains store and update quantitative internal variables. Primates and rodents, for example, have an internal sense of whether they are 1 or 10 meters away from a landmark and whether a ripe fruit is twice or four times as appetizing as a less ripe counterpart. Such quantitative internal signals are the basis of cognitive function; however, our understanding of how the brain stores and updates these variables remains fragmentary. I will discuss imaging and perturbation experiments in tethered, walking Drosophila whose goal is to determine how internal variables are calculated and how they influence behavior. Specifically, in the central complex a set of heading neurons have been described, whose activity tracks the fly’s orientation, similar to head direction cells in rodents. The circuit architecture that gives rise to these orientation tracking properties remains unknown. I will describe a set of clockwise- and counterclockwise-shifting neurons whose wiring and calcium dynamics provide a means to rotate the heading system’s angular estimate over time. Shifting neurons are required for properly tracking the fly's movements in the dark, and their stimulation induces a rotation of the heading signal in the expected direction and by the expected amount. The central features of this circuit are analogous to models proposed for head direction cells in rodents and may thus inform how neural systems, in general, perform integration.
fiona.woods@cncb.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 3rd April 13:00 - 14:00 Professor Matthias Merkenschlager Lymphocyte Development Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London Biochemistry Department Seminar A new rationale for TF paralog evolution, expression and function Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
Gene duplications are major drivers in the evolution of biological complexity, but the forces that shape paralog evolution remain incompletely understood. RUNX transcription factor paralogs are expressed in mutually exclusive cell types, sacrificing potential robustness conferred by gene duplications without obvious gain. To elucidate this issue, we explored two RUNX-dependent developmental branch points. In both settings, RUNX paralogs differed in their functional properties, providing a rationale for selective paralog expression, and allowing us to identify paralog-specific amino acids that modulate the strength of DNA binding and gene regulatory control. Remarkably, in both paradigms examined, the non-endogenously expressed paralog was biologically more potent than the endogenously expressed paralog, increasing the generation of specialized cell types regardless of environmental conditions. These findings suggest submaximal regulatory control as a driver for transcription factor paralog evolution, a conclusion supported by the evolutionary trajectory of RUNT domain residues, which indicates selection of sequences that moderate DNA binding and gene regulatory control.
head@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Thursday 6th April 14:00 - 15:00 Zhiyi Wu, Mabel Wong University of Oxford
University of Oxford
SBCB Seminar Series SBCB seminar Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
anna.duncan@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 10th April 13:00 - 14:00 Jennifer Potts University of York OUBS Title TBC Main seminar room, Biochemistry Building, Main seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
oubs@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 24th April 13:00 - 14:00 Professor Colin Kleanthous Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford OUBS Title TBC Main seminar room, Biochemistry Building, Main seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
oubs@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Tuesday 2nd May 11:00 - 12:00 Dr Damon Huber University of Birmingham Biochemistry Department Seminar “The way is the goal: recognition and targeting of proteins by the Sec translocation machinery in bacteria” Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
ben.berks@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 8th May 13:00 - 14:00 Chris Schofield University of Oxford OUBS Title TBC Main seminar room, Biochemistry Building, Main seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
oubs@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Wednesday 10th May 13:00 - 14:00 Dr. Daniel Wolfram Gerlich Senior Research Group Leader, IMBA, Austria Biochemistry Department Seminar Title TBC Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
head@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 15th May 13:00 - 14:00 Marisa Martin Fernandez University of Oxford OUBS Title TBC Main seminar room, Biochemistry Building, Main seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
oubs@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 15th May 16:00 - 17:00 Professor Anthony Leung (MBiochem, Oxon) John Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA Biochemistry Department Seminar "ADP-ribosylation Site Identification: Discovery from Cancer to Virus" Main Seminar Room,
mark.howarth@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 22nd May 13:00 - 14:00 Professor Shabaz Mohammed Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford OUBS Title TBC Main seminar room, Biochemistry Building, Main seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
oubs@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Wednesday 24th May 16:00 - 17:00 Dr Richard Henderson, FRS Programme Leader, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture The cryoEM revolution in structural biology Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
head@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 5th June 13:00 - 14:00 Prof Elspeth Garman University of Oxford OUBS Title TBC Main seminar room, Biochemistry Building, Main seminar room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
oubs@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 12th June 13:00 - 14:00 Professor Robin Allshire Professor of Chromosome Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh Biochemistry Department Seminar Title TBC Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
head@bioch.ox.ac.uk
TBA TBA Monday 3rd July 13:00 - 14:00 Dr. Arantza Barrios Research Associate, University College London Biochemistry Department Seminar Title TBC Main Seminar Room, Biochemistry Building, Main Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3QU
head@bioch.ox.ac.uk

Please visit the Medical Sciences Division seminar page, or our seminar links page for other seminars which may be of interest.

Search

 

Related Information

Share This