Crystallography

Department of Biochemistry Image Taken by Fisher Studios

The Crystallography Facility enables you to apply the methods of X-ray crystallography to your biological questions. We can offer both state of the art equipment and expert advice and training in the use of crystallography for structural biology.

Department of Biochemistry Image Taken by Fisher Studios

The Crystallography Facility enables you to apply the methods of X-ray crystallography to your biological questions. We can offer both state of the art equipment and expert advice and training in the use of crystallography for structural biology.

Department of Biochemistry Image Taken by Fisher Studios

The Crystallography Facility enables you to apply the methods of X-ray crystallography to your biological questions. We can offer both state of the art equipment and expert advice and training in the use of crystallography for structural biology.

Department of Biochemistry Image Taken by Fisher Studios

The Crystallography Facility enables you to apply the methods of X-ray crystallography to your biological questions. We can offer both state of the art equipment and expert advice and training in the use of crystallography for structural biology.

Facility information

In the Crystallography Facility we offer a full suite of facilities and support to enable you to study the structure of both soluble and membrane-associated proteins by means of X-ray crystallography. Equipment, facilities and advice are available to help you through the whole process from starting to a protein sample to finishing with interpreting a structural model.

 

We have two robots to aid in preparing crystallisation trials, a TTP Labtech Mosquito suitable for a wide range of vapour diffusion experiments and an Art Robbins Gryphon specialised for the cubic phase crystallisation of membrane proteins.

 

To help you follow the progress of your crystallisation trials we have two robotic crystallisation incubators that store experiments at 4 °C or 18 ºC and automatically take pictures using both visible and UV light that you can inspect from your own computer using a web browser. We also have a selection of bench top microscopes that you can use both to harvest crystal once they have grown.

 

We also organise time at large scale synchrotron facilities such as Diamond and the ESRF and provide assistance in using them to obtain X-ray diffraction from your crystals. Once this has been achieved we also provide computing assistance to help you analyse your data and solve your structure.

 

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Ed (edward.lowe@bioch.ox.ac.uk)
 

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